New in the Chelly Wood Store: Clasps, Buttons, Velcro, and More!

In this photo, three images are featured. The first (upper left) shows orange, blue, yellow, and green miniature doll-sized buttons; the second (lower left) displays a jumble of wiry parts which when assembled, will be used as clasps to hold a doll's overall straps to the overall's bib; the third is a row of 3 inch (76 mm) zippers. This third image takes up most of the left quadrant of the turquoise blue linen frame. Then, in the lower left quadrant, we see the Chelly Wood dot com logo.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

In my store (found under the “Shop” button in the main menu on my website), you can now purchase clasps, buttons, Velcro, and more. Today’s blog post details each of these items.

Let’s start with clasps.

The image shows the size of these teeny-tiny miniature overalls clasps, as compared to a woman's hand. Each piece is so tiny, it's like the head of a straight pin!
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

I bought the overalls clasps shown in the palm of my hand above, from a store called I Sew for Doll on Etsy. They have quite a few tiny items that you can’t buy anywhere else!

But before you buy clasps for your tiny dolls’ overalls, you might want to read yesterday’s blog post about purchasing products that have been imported from China. It’s important to be an informed buyer, and yesterday’s blog post dips into the dark political history of China while explaining my reasons for including links to stores like I Sew for Doll.

Feel free to leave your own comments on yesterday’s blog post. It’s good to get different opinions on matters pertaining to global concerns around products made for sewists like you and me.

Here we see a close-up of the doll-sized overalls clasps, including the little metal hook (shaped like the silhouette of a baby bottle's nipple) and the tiny brads that form a shank-style button for the end of the wire piece to go around. They have a brass-ish color to them.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

These tiny overalls clasps are super small but incredibly detailed, as you can see in the image above. There are also overalls clasps for bigger dolls’ overalls on Etsy, and I offer recommendations in my store, for different clasps, for various doll sizes.

The littlest clasps are for dolls that are 10 inches tall or smaller.

Okay. Let’s move on to buttons.

This photo (surrounded by a blue frame) shows two different sizes of doll buttons next to a thimble. The smallest of these doll buttons are purple and orange; they are 3 mm in diameter. The other two doll buttons are yellow and pink; they are 6 mm in diameter. These objects (the thimble and all 4 buttons) rest in the palm of a woman's hand. The ChellyWood.com logo appears at the bottom of the turquoise blue linen frame that surrounds the photo.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

Buttons come in various shapes and sizes on Etsy, and I recommend buying buttons that are 3 mm in diameter or smaller for dolls that are Barbie sized or smaller.

The bigger button size in the palm of my hand below, is a 6 mm in diameter button. These work great for Wellie Wishers, American Girl, and other 13 inch to 18 inch dolls; however they’re more for show than for functionality.

Here are two images of a woman's hand. In one image, there are pastel-colored 6 millimeter buttons displayed in the palm of the woman's hand; in the other image, a smattering of brightly colored 6 millimeter diameter buttons are resting in the palm of the woman's hand.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

These are often available at craft stores and fabric stores, like JoAnn’s.

The teeny-tiny 3 mm buttons (shown below in little tiny zipper pouch baggies) are a little harder to find, but they can be found on Etsy and a few other places online.

Here we see a tiny plaid doll's shirt embellished with miniature buttons made of green plastic. To the left of the doll's shirts are itty-bitty bags of similarly made miniature buttons in the following colors: black, white, yellow, purple, orange, and pink. These items lay on a pale blue cutting mat beside a thimble, to demonstrate their miniscule size. The tiny plastic buttons are approximately 3 millimeters in diameter each.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

These tiny buttons are definitely more for decoration than an actual closure device, although the 6 mm buttons can be used with a loop made of embroidery floss.

Here’s one of those embroidery floss closures I made for Curvy Barbie, although the 6 mm buttons do look a little clunky on a Barbie-sized doll, to be honest:

The image shows Mattel's Curvy Barbie modeling a hand-made shirt with cloth-covered tiny buttons. Each button is encompassed by a floss loop, all hand-made by the seamstress who blogs here, at ChellyWood.com.
Visit ChellyWood.com for sewing patterns to fit dolls of many shapes and sizes.

If you’d like to see the video where I teach you how to make those cloth-covered buttons with embroidery floss loops, click here.

But as I’ve said, most doll clothing sewists use buttons to embellish, rather than as a closure. For the two vintage Skipper shirts shown below, I have used size 4/0 Dritz snaps to close the shirts, but colorful 3 mm buttons appear on the outside of the shirt for a more realistic look.

Here we see two little shirts which have been handmade to fit a vintage Skipper doll. The shirt on the left is made of white cotton with a multicolored plaid print in the colors green, yellow, and orange. This shirt has tiny green buttons running down the front opening, all in a perfectly spaced row. The shirt has short, tee shirt length sleeves, but is made of 100% cotton, not jersey fabric. The shirt on the left is also made of 100% cotton, but its print is floral, with flowers in the colors red, blue, and yellow, along with tiny green leaves. This shirt has three-quarter length sleeves and is embellished with miniature yellow buttons that are somewhat difficult to notice on the brightly colored, busy floral print. The two shirts rest atop a pale blue cutting mat.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

Because they’re usually just an embellishment, rather than an actual closure device, my links to places where you can buy tiny miniature buttons for your dolls’ clothes will appear on both the closure page, in my store, and the embellishments page.

Now let’s talk about Velcro.

A woman's hand holds an unopened package of black sew-on Velcro with the Velcro logo, which looks like a white checkmark (or stylized letter "V") surrounded by a red circle. The bra (a type of paper packaging) around this black Velcro is still in tact, demonstrating that the package has never been opened. In black letters, we can read the words "Velcro" and "Sew On" across the bra (paper packaging).
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

You want to look for “Sew On” Velcro, with the actual Velcro label, like you see in the image above. I’ve made the mistake of purchasing other brands, and lived to regret it.

And another thing, the actual Velcro company does make little stick-on Velcro squares for crafting (see image below), but I do NOT recommend using these for doll clothes closures. These stick-on Velcro squares are designed for other materials besides cotton fabric, not for sewing.

A woman's hand holds up a plastic sheet of glue-backed Velcro squares. These are marked with the Velcro logo, and they are made of white Velcro, but each square is affixed to the plastic sheets of packaging with a glue-like substance that will stick the Velcro squares onto an object like paper, craft foam, or wood. Through the photo (superimposed over the woman's hand and the Velcro squares she holds) is a red circle with a line through it, as if to say, "NO! Don't use this!"
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

I have been known to scavenge hook-and-loop products from garments I’m recycling, from time to time, but be advised that when you do so, you do run the risk of possibly using a less-high quality of product than brand-name Velcro products.

However, recycling garments and other fabric products is good for the environment, and I have been able to use generic hook-and-loop products that were appropriated from garments or cloth products, with some success in my doll clothing sewing projects.

In the image below, Figure A shows an actual Velcro brand product. It’s certainly colorful, and the strip opens and closes with little effort.

On a purple cotton background with tiny white polka dots, a white arrow labeled "figure A" points to a woman's hand holding a strip of royal blue Velcro open. Figure B's arrow shows the same woman's hand pulling down the Velcro on a pre-sewn piece of Velcro that's white and is partly attached to white cotton fabric.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

The white hook-and-loop closure product shown in the image above (Figure B) was originally used to seal a cloth sack that some cotton bedsheets came in.

Once the bedsheets were out of the packaging, I turned the cloth sack into the white shirt shown on my Anna doll below, and the hook-and-loop closure that I scavenged from the cloth sack became the shirt’s closure. It may or may not have been an actual Velcro brand product, but it works fine!

Anna from Frozen II (a mini toddler doll from Disney) seems to be in the middle of a song or dance, as her right hand is extended toward the viewer, her lips are parted, and her left hand is stretched out from her swirly skirt. She wears a white shirt with T-shirt-like sleeves and a tiny floofy harvest-patterned sunflower skirt in the colors maroon (background color), gold (sunflower print) and brown (the center of the tiny sunflowers. She wears maroon plastic flat shoes. The ChellyWood.com logo appears in the lower right corner.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

You may not be aware that Velcro comes in a variety of colors and is easily trimmed down to the sizes you need, when creating closures for your doll clothes.

Have a look at the image below. All of these bits and pieces came from a skein of Velcro like the black sew-on Velcro that appears in the upper right-hand corner of the photo.

The image shows a woman's hand holding a short, narrow strip of tan Velcro that has been opened at one end to expose the hook end and the soft end of the Velcro. All around this woman's hand are various pieces of Velcro in different sizes, lengths, widths, and colors. At the top of the image, there's an unopened package of black sew-on Velcro. The other colors of Velcro shown include pink, red, and blue, along with the tan that the woman's hand is holding.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

The royal blue strip on the left hand side is what these bits and pieces looked like before I cut them down to fit the back closure of various doll shirts and dresses.

I have one caveat, though, and it’s an important one! Don’t use your sewing scissors to cut the sew-on Velcro strips into smaller bits and pieces. Instead, use craft scissors.

And now let’s end with a quick chat about Zippers.

Here we see a row of tiny zippers laying on a cutting mat. The cutting mat measures 5 inches high by 8 inches long. Each of these little zippers fits well within the 5 inch width of the cutting mat's borders, and the zipping part of the zippers is only 3 inches long or so. The zippers appear in the following colors (left to right): pink, green, blue, and red.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

The zippers in the image are lying on a cutting mat that’s 5 inches wide by 8 inches long. (Sorry the cutting mat is upside down!) For those of you living outside the US, 5 inches is 12.7 cm or 127 mm.

But when you look closely at the zippers, the zippy part is only about 3 inches long. These are classified as three-inch zippers, not 4 and 3/4 inch zippers! You don’t count the extensions that hang over the top and down at the bottom.

So when ordering zippers for your doll clothes, pay attention to how much actual zip space you need, and place your order accordingly.

Here we see a pink satin dress from the back. The neckline dips low on the doll's back, with a V that comes to a point at the top of a white zipper. The dress's skirt has two darts that point inward at the waist, toward the zipper. There's a slight vent below the zipper. The dress is made of pink satin.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

Well, that’s all I have on closures at this time, although my store‘s “Closures” page will include additional goodies, like hook-and-eye closures, miniature belt buckles, and toggle clasps, which are great for closing a doll’s cape!

If I missed any other types of closures, please leave a suggestion in the comments section. I’ll gladly add those notions as well, if I’ve forgotten something.

At a later date, I’ll do a blog post on ribbons, which can also be used as a closure, but which will be listed under embellishments instead, in my store.

Here we see a close-up of a black and white Gingham dress (made to fit Vintage Skipper) and the red bolero that's worn over the top of the gingham dress. The red bolero is made of solid red cotton fabric with a black one-eighth inch wide ribbon tied in a bow at the top of the bolero where the neckline comes together.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

If you would like to make a donation to this free doll clothes pattern website, please click here. There’s also a “Donate” button in the main menu.

For anyone who would like to expand their dolls’ wardrobes, you should really check out my “How to Alter Doll Clothes Patterns” course and my “Design Your Own Doll Pants Patterns from Scratch” classes on the Creative Spark online learning platform. Here’s my bio page on their website, where you can learn more.

This image shows four rows of artist's renderings of doll clothing items. The top row shows four different styles of pants. The second row shows four different styles of shirts. The third row shows four different styles of skirts. The fourth row shows four different styles of dresses, with skirts in long, short, and mid-length styles. The text reads at the top, "Classes in Doll Clothing Design" followed by this paragraph: "Have you ever wished you could create patterns of your own? Click on the links to Chelly's online courses below, to learn more about her paid courses in doll clothing pattern design techniques."

For any class on Creative Spark, you don’t have to follow a schedule. Just sign up when you’re ready.

It’s a one-time fee for the course, and there’s no specific time limit to finish your course. You can just take your time and learn at the pace that suits you. So go check out my paid courses on Creative Spark, using this link.

As always, feel free to pin, like, or tweet about my free patterns and tutorials.

If you enjoyed this blog post, and you’d like to see my videos, you might want to navigate over to my YouTube channel, ChellyWood1 to look through my playlists.

To read more about my free sewing patterns and tutorials, please visit the “Helpful Tips” page.

Disclaimer/Credit/Affiliate Marketing Link:

*Please note: when you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include Amazon, JoAnn Fabric, Etsy, and the eBay Partner Network. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases. To learn more about how my website uses affiliate marketing, please visit the website’s Privacy Policy page.

Chelly Wood and the ChellyWood.com website are not affiliated with any of the doll or toy companies mentioned in this blog post, but Chelly enjoys designing her doll clothes to fit a variety of dolls. To learn more about the doll companies mentioned in today’s post, please visit the doll or toy company’s website.

2 thoughts on “New in the Chelly Wood Store: Clasps, Buttons, Velcro, and More!

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.