Free pattern for Renaissance costume to fit Barbie @ ChellyWood.com #Renfaire #DollClothes

This photo shows a Made to Move Barbie with Asian features modeling a handmade Renaissance costume, complete with a green puff-sleeved tunic, a vest with a squared fringe, a hat with turret-like edge, and a pair of plastic boots that have green pants tucked into them. The overlay says, Chelly Wood, reminding us to visit Chelly Wood dot com to access the free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making this Renaissance costume for Barbie and other similar sized fashion dolls.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

For your free patterns and tutorial videos, please scroll down to the second set of bullets.

Today’s costume is one of the earliest patterns I made for this website. In fact, the Renaissance hat was designed with the instructions on the pattern itself, sort of like how commercial patterns offer written instructions.

When I designed that hat, I was thinking I’d create written instructions for all the patterns I was going to design for my doll-version of Romeo and Juliet in stop motion. Of course, that didn’t turn out to be the case; instead, I ended up making tutorial videos for nearly all of the costumes I designed for the production.

This costume was worn a character akin to Peter (although he had an extra scene in my version of Romeo and Juliet that Peter doesn’t have in the original Shakespeare play). My Peter character also wore a pair of cloth boots, as you can see here:

Here we see a Barbie dressed in Renaissance garb and wielding a sword. Her hat is a headband with a cotton frame draping down over her head and shoulder. She has a puff-sleeve tunic with skirting, and over the top of that, her doublet vest has squared edging below the waist. She wears embroidered trousers and knee-high flannel boots.

As I recall, I wasn’t happy with the way those boots turned out, so I never released a pattern for them. Or if I did release a pattern for them, it has been lost among the various blog posts on this website.

I still own these boots, though, as you can see here:

Here we see a pair of boots which are essentially designed as a long tube that's wider at the top than at the bottom, and sealed at the bottom, where the doll's toes would be. There are tiny red embroidery floss stitches down the seam of the boots, and the brown flannel fabric is turned inside out at the top to simulate a cuff. The watermark says "Chelly Wood."
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

I decided I didn’t like these boots because the cloth was slippery on my Kaiser doll stands, and while we were filming, I kept having slip-and-fall problems with the doll who played Peter. We’d be in the middle of the scene when Peter would just face plant! Ugh! So yeah… these were not my favorite boots.

However, as many of my regular followers may recall, I did end up designing nicer boots for Ken dolls, both for the doll who played Romeo, and for others. To see those boots, just go to my 12 inch male fashion doll page. (But those are not designed to fit Barbie, unfortunately.)

Anyway, that’s why there’s no pattern for the boots with today’s project. My Made-to-Move Barbie is wearing a pair of Liv doll boots, I believe, in this more recent photo:

A Made to Move Barbie appears to be walking toward the photographer, wearing a green tunic with long, puffed sleeves, a Renaissance hat that flaps over a Renaissance style headband, a brown vest to match the brown hat, a pair of green trousers which are tucked into knee-high brown plastic boots. The watermark reminds us to go to ChellyWood.com for free patterns and tutorial videos (plus one written instruction page) to make this Renaissance faire style costume to fit a Mattel Barbie and similar sized dolls.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

Truthfully, the pants pattern drawn on today’s pattern isn’t all that fantastic either. You might want to use this one instead, since that pattern would also make a pair of trousers for a fashion doll but the more recent pattern is much prettier to look at!

And then I have some more bad news. The vest pattern is just the bodice without the dart, and using the back pieces as front pieces and the front pieces as back pieces. Again, it doesn’t have a tutorial, but you might be able to figure out how to fold bias tape to make the fringe at the bottom, if you watch how I added fringe to my Curvy Barbie crop top in this video.

Sorry I don’t have more to offer, but as I said, this outfit goes back to the very earliest days of this blog. At the time, I didn’t realize my blog was going to grow into a hub for free doll clothes patterns and tutorials.

To make today’s outfit, you’ll need cotton for the pants, tunic, hat, and the lining of the vest, flannel for the outer fabric of the vest, bias tape for the edging at the bottom of the vest, and embroidery floss for embellishing the costume. I used size 4/0 snaps for this costume as well.

Today’s patterns will fit these dolls:

Here are your free, printable PDF sewing patterns and tutorial videos for making the outfit shown at the top of this page:

Feel free to pinlike, or tweet about my free patterns and tutorials. If you can’t find a specific pattern, just submit a question to me directly.

Please visit ChellyWood.com for FREE printable sewing patterns for dolls of many shapes and sizes. Image shows a printable sewing pattern for making a "Renaissance tunic... for fashion dolls." There are images of two of Mattel's Barbie dolls wearing the tunic. One doll wears the tunic with a sort of skirting; the other wears the tunic in a shorter version without the skirting. Overlay offers the website: ChellyWood.com as a place to find "free doll clothes patterns and tutorials".
Please visit ChellyWood.com for FREE printable sewing patterns for dolls of many shapes and sizes.

Disclaimer/Credit/Affiliate Marketing Link:

*ChellyWood.com earns money by linking to Amazon, eBay, Michaels, Etsy, and other online affiliate programs. Links provided above may be affiliate links. For a full list of my affiliate programs, and to understand how cookies are used to help this website earn money, please see my “Privacy Policy” page.

To honor the trademark rights of the doll companies mentioned in this blog post, I am including links to their websites here. Please feel free to visit their website and consider purchasing one or more of the dolls mentioned.

Queens of Africa dolls are products offered by the Slice by Cake company, which holds the trademark for them (™). They were designed by Taofick Okoya. Please visit the Queens of Africa website to learn more about their company and its trademarked toys, books, and fashions.

Momoko dolls are products offered by Petworks, which holds the trademark for them (™). Please visit the Momoko Dolls website to learn more about their company and its trademarked toys.

Barbie, MTM Barbie, Francie, and Vintage Barbie dolls are products offered by Mattel, which holds the registered trademark for them (™). Please visit the Mattel Toys website to learn more about their company and its trademarked toys.

Liv dolls were products designed and distributed by the Spin Master company, which still makes dolls and toys today (although the Liv dolls are no longer in production at the time of this blog post). The Spin Master company held the trademark for the Liv Dolls (™). Please visit the Spin Master Toys and Games website to learn more about their company and its trademarked toys and games. Please be aware that the Chelly Wood animated doll is a Spin Master Liv doll that has been re-painted and had its wig colored to appear to look like the real doll clothing designer, Chelly Wood. This was done as a creative project by Chelly’s daughters, and the Spin Master Toys and Games company was not involved in the doll’s makeover in any way.

Disney Princess dolls are products offered by the Disney corporation, which holds the trademark for them (™). Please visit the Disney Toys website to learn more about their company and its trademarked toys.

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