Vintage Barbie doll clothes patterns with underpants pattern — try McCall Pattern #6420 #VintageBarbie #VintageSewing

This is a close-up image of a McCall's Barbie doll clothes pattern (number 6420, which has the copyright 1962 on the envelope. The patterns shown include a black tux with bow tie for Ken, a wedding dress with hat and veil for Barbie, a ballet or ice skating dress for Barbie (with a cone shaped hat), a pajama with bloomers for Baribe, a dress with 3/4 length sleeves and a turtle neck for Barbie, and a cape with hat for Barbie. You can learn more about this vintage Barbie pattern from McCall's by visiting ChellyWood.com and clicking on the category "Old Patterns from Chelly's Collection" in the list of categories on the side margin.

If you’ve been sewing for dolls for very long, you’re probably aware that doll underpants patterns are hard to come by. Of course, I have free underpants patterns on this website, and my patterns will fit lots of dolls, including the 6 inch American Girl dolls, Skipper, Barbie, and many Barbie-sized dolls, in addition to my baby doll bloomers and 18″ doll underpants pattern. (Click on those links to find them.)

But today I’m showing you a vintage Barbie pattern that has a bunch of accessories, including a pattern for underpants, hat patterns, a swimsuit pattern, and the biggest surprise of all: a pattern for a pair of shoes for Ken!

The underpants double as bloomers for the nightgown shown on the front of the McCall’s doll clothes pattern #6420, as you can see here:

Here we see the Chelly Wood doll (she's actually a Liv doll that has had a make-over so it looks like the real person, Chelly Wood) holding up McCall's vintage Barbie pattern #6420 which has images of Barbie wearing six different outfits. The pattern's container is very worn but the images are colorful and sharp. This pattern was marked with a copyright of 1962.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable sewing patterns for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

What’s really surprising about this old pattern, which is marked with a copyright for 1962, is the fact that it contains not just patterns for making the six outfits shown on the front, but also the six outfits shown on the back too!

The image shows a close up of the back side of McCall's craft pattern #6420 which was printed in 1962. There are six outfits pictured here, including a white jacket tuxedo with cummerbund, pants, and felt shoes for Ken, a fairly simple dress with clutch purse for Barbie, a pair of ankle pants with a sweater that has a collar for Barbie, an evening gown with a short skirt that has a ruffle for Barbie (and includes a pair of underpants), a 1960's style swimsuit for Barbie, and a swimsuit cover-up for Barbie. To learn more about this pattern, please go to ChellyWood.com and use the search tool for Pattern #6420
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable sewing patterns for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

Normally, the flip side of patterns come with instructions for making the outfits, like what type of fabric is suggested and how many yards of fabric (or ribbon or lace or whatever) you’ll need to make the outfits.

Here’s an example of what I mean… The pattern back below belongs to the Mattel Pattern #2896 that I posted images of on Monday, August 10th. Click here to look back at that post.

The image shows the back of Mattel Barbie pattern #2896. In the blog post which includes this image, we're learning about how a used pattern isn't always "what you see is what you get" and specifically, the pattern we're talking about in this blog post is an antique pattern for sewing Barbie doll clothes for Mattel's vintage Barbie from 1962 or earlier. With this image, we're comparing the instructions on the back of Mattel Pattern #2896 to the back of McCall's Pattern number 6420.
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable sewing patterns for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

Granted, that was also a vintage pattern, so there aren’t a lot of details given on the back of that doll clothes pattern either, but at least they tell us we’ll need 1/4 yard of fabric for most of the outfits.

I love the wording there, too: “Barbie has an outfit for every occasion: work or play, night or day.” How cute is that?

I just found it interesting that the McCall’s 6420 pattern didn’t have any guidelines on the package itself. In fact, it says, “For materials required, see enclosed easy sewing guide.” So you would have had to purchase the pattern first, open it up, and then go shopping for your fabric and notions. It seems a little awkward at best, but I wasn’t even born yet in 1962, so maybe shopping for sewing materials and patterns worked differently back then.

Finally, I’d like to conclude with the statement that although this set of patterns is packed with great accessories, it doesn’t come with a pattern for the clutch purse shown in view G:

The image shows a close up of the back side of McCall's craft pattern #6420 which was printed in 1962. There are six outfits pictured here, including a white jacket tuxedo with cummerbund, pants, and felt shoes for Ken, a fairly simple dress with clutch purse for Barbie, a pair of ankle pants with a sweater that has a collar for Barbie, an evening gown with a short skirt that has a ruffle for Barbie (and includes a pair of underpants), a 1960's style swimsuit for Barbie, and a swimsuit cover-up for Barbie. To learn more about this pattern, please go to ChellyWood.com and use the search tool for Pattern #6420
Please visit ChellyWood.com for free printable sewing patterns for making doll clothes to fit dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

I’m finding this to be true time and time again with doll clothes patterns. They will often display a purse that isn’t part of the pattern set. I have several doll clothes patterns that do this.

So guess what my new tutorial will feature this week…

The image shows a close-up of a Made to Move Barbie's hand holding a handmade clutch purse. It's made of turquoise colored fabric with a matching ribbon strap. The clutch purse closes with a little black snap at the end of a pointed flap closure.
Visit ChellyWood.com for free printable sewing patterns for making doll clothes for dolls of many shapes and all different sizes.

Do any of you own doll clothes patterns that have a lot of great accessories, like shoes, hats, purses, bow ties, socks or stockings, and underwear? Feel free to let us know which ones in the comments.

And if any of you are wondering how to safely purchase the vintage McCall’s Pattern #6420 that I’m showing in this blog post, please look back at an earlier post about “Buying Used Patterns.

2 thoughts on “Vintage Barbie doll clothes patterns with underpants pattern — try McCall Pattern #6420 #VintageBarbie #VintageSewing

  1. Well — I was born before 1962. In fact, I was ten when Barbie came on the market. I spent my allowance to buy one, and I have a modest collection of vintage Barbie patterns, including this one. With doll clothes in general, it didn’t matter about the amount of fabric and notions because we used scraps exclusively. With a little experience, you knew what you needed. And as a girl, I wasn’t concerned about making doll accessories. My Barbie wouldn’t hold a purse anyway.

    1. I also used scrap fabric exclusively, when I sewed for Barbie as a young girl.

      Then, when I got into high school, I started a small business for myself, selling my Barbie outfits to local families that I also babysat for. That’s when I started buying fabric in 1/3 yard pieces, so I could reproduce the same outfits for people who ordered them.

      Thank you for leaving your comment, Kathy. It’s really fun to hear about other people’s experiences sewing for Barbie! It’s neat that you actually have this pattern in your collection… what a coincidence!

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